What’s Wrong with Adult Coloring Books

 

Whats Wrong with Adult Coloring Books

I recently read a thought-provoking post from Lisa Mitchell at Inner Canvas, Warning, adult coloring books could do more harm than good. I’ve been grappling with my thoughts and feelings about adult coloring books, paint nights, and other “scripted,” art activities for some time. While I agree with her on many points, I’d like to add my thoughts to this discussion.

I Don’t Like Coloring Books, But…

I don’t buy coloring books for my kids. “Paint nite” images make me cringe. There’s so little originality and expressiveness in these images, what you have to say is so much more interesting, even if it’s not “pretty.”

But I know that for many people the artistic freedom of early childhood has been long forgotten. Trying to speak through art again takes practice. I also know that coloring pages offer well-defined expectations and a structure within which folks feel safe. Because there’s not a lot of thought or input required, it can also be a mindful or meditative practice.

Lisa Mitchell makes the excellent point that coloring pages can be just as “empty” as watching television. While  I wholeheartedly agree they are not expressive, or even hugely creative, I would encourage you to do a coloring page before you channel surf or troll social media.

 

Are Adult Coloring Books Art?

I see coloring pages as a way of bringing a very small, but creative experience to the masses. There’s a great deal of curiosity in our culture at the moment about the healing powers of art, and the intersections of art and  mindfulness.

Coloring pages can be relaxing and mindful. There is value in that. I believe strongly though that each of us has creative and artistic power. Perhaps if you enjoy coloring pages, you will try your hand at doodling, art journaling, or a painting class.

So attend your local paint nite, buy a coloring book and indulge in it. And then let yourself take the next step. Try out a tutorial for some doodles. See how to turn paint splotches into animals. Imitate the random mark making of a toddler. Play. You might be surprised at what you find. Or try following the steps I’ve outlined below.

What’s the worst that could happen? Someone sees you playing with crayons?

Art Journal Page Mixed Media Early Stages

Let Your Art Take You on a Journey

What coloring books don’t offer that an image does is a journey. Mystery. Transformation.

In a coloring book, you can make choices about colors, or perhaps experiment with blending, but there’s a lack of flexibility, risk-taking, and creative self-expression. This, in my opinion, takes the soul out of the art.

Just like in life, there are a lot of unknowns in art. Each new color you add to a canvas changes all the others. Paying attention to these parallels can be profound. When you color in someone else’s lines, you miss the opportunity to explore your feelings and contemplate the metaphors as you watch the image emerge.

Sewing in Journals

 

Sewing Detail Journal Page

 

Drawing with String Journal Page

Art Requires Attention

There is no step by step process I can give you for making a beautiful or expressive art piece. It’s about paying attention. Listening, head cocked and ears strained, you step quietly until the next footfall becomes clear.  It takes attention, patience, and courage to uncover our images. That’s a mindful practice.

Stage 2 Journal Page

Coloring Outside the Lines: My Artistic Process

I wanted to share my artistic process for this journal page because it shows how winding, unplanned, and healing art can be.

I painted the red and pink background a few weeks ago for this post, and set it aside.

Recently, I cut tracing paper into large tear drop shapes. I wrote all over these about an issue that has weighed heavy on my heart.

After writing for some time, I found resolution in a phrase: “The gift is focusing on the good.” I highlighted it in glitter.

Next I sewed the pieces on the page. I’ve been wanting to do a more extensively sewn page, so this was my chance.

To add color, I colored over most of the tear shapes, smudging the colors together with my finger.

I stood back from my piece numerous times to see what it needed, and added color, fabric, and ribbon edging.

I sewed over the whole page, “drawing”  leaf-like shapes with the sewing machine in a random pattern.

I love this piece. It feels satisfying to create something beautiful out of my pain. It also reminds me of what’s important –  and I need that.

Creative Self-Care

If you are looking for forum for support around art and self-care, join our private Facebook community, Creative Self-Care. 

Finished Sewn Journal Page

 

Comments:

What’s your experience of making art? Do you enjoy coloring pages as an adult? Is your art making highly structured and planned, or open and meandering?

Title Image: 123rf.com: karakotsya

 

Update 11/2015: I’ve created a DIY Adult Coloring Book free for download. It will give you enough structure to get your own designs going, if that interests you. I hope you enjoy!

You can find another thoughtful article about both sides of this debate here.

35 Comments

  1. Hiria Shanks

    Hi Amy ………… I have been encouraging adult colouring for colleages and clients, for several reasons. To help them with their anxiety and focus on something different similar to having a jig-saw puzzle set up. Another reason is that it can lead on to other art creativity. I look forward to hearing other comments.
    Hiria

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      HI Hiria!

      Oh I’m so psyched that you stopped by to comment! Thank you. I’m so heartened to hear how people are finding coloring books helpful for anxiety, and I too share your hope that it opens doors to other creative endeavors. There are many art tutorials in the right side bar if you want to check out some different options.
      Cheers,

      Amy

      Reply
  2. mandy

    Yes there is the restriction of set pictures and patterns of a colouring book but at least I am being creative and doing. I would not consider what you suggest in your blog. Too artsy. I make my colouring book as expressive as I can- blending colours, trying out contrasting colours and having fun! It is not empty and in no way similar to watching TV

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      HI Mandy:

      Thank you so much for taking the time to read and comment here! I so appreciate what you have shared. This is exactly the sort of feedback I was hoping to get – hearing about how you make it your own, why it’s not just empty. It sounds very relaxing and fun and I can definitely see how you add your touch.

      You make a good point that I really should have included a very simple, accessible art activity – like coloring in your doodles. I wonder, would you ever made your own coloring book by using an approach like Zentangle? I of course am always invested in helping people take their creativity to the next level, but I also appreciate that you may always find 100% satisfaction and stay there. Thank you so much for teaching me about your experience. You’ve added a lot to this discussion!

      If you are feeling curious, you might check out any of the tutorials in the right side bar.

      Cheers,

      Amy

      Reply
  3. Kaitlynn

    I love your sewn art journal page! Once I invest in a sewing machine, I will have to try something similar! I keep an adult coloring book with mandalas and some colored pencils in my desk at work. I use it when I feel a panic attack coming on and need something relaxing to rest my brain. Finding the patterns can help calm my panic and keep me focused. Then, when I get home, I like to art journal about my day in a more creative way!

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      HI Kaitlynn:

      I am so grateful for all these explanations about the value of coloring books. What a great coping skill – keeping the coloring book at the ready at work. Like Heather, you do a great job of explaining how someone could both use a coloring book and something more expressive as well. Color on!

      Cheers,

      Amy

      Reply
  4. Heather

    Very thought provoking! Thank you for this discussion!
    When I went through art therapy training in the 90’s, coloring books were considered taboo to our practice. Many years later, my art therapy toolbox has expanded a bit to include coloring books. Oftentimes with art therapy clients the art/media serves as a container for emotions, safe place for personal choice and experiences, self expression and exploration, a prompt for reflection and an entity/essence that can be reimagined, reworked and recycled. Coloring pages can at times be used for these objectives….
    In my personal art, I find the same to be true. I often embellish the pages with zentangles and collage images and quotes or journaling. I find them nourishing and a great source of connection.

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      HI Heather!

      Welcome to Mindful Art Studio! You do such a great job of articulating the ways in which coloring books can be of value for emotional catharsis and expression, both with clients and for artists as well. I really appreciate you adding to this discussion. I too found that teens in residential benefitted from the containment they provided.

      Cheers,

      Amy

      Reply
  5. Hilary

    Hi Amy
    Sometimes it’s necessary to be where the patient is. Coloring books offer a safe avenue to older adults that have not thought of being creative since they were children. It’s a window into starting them to be creative and not be embarrassed
    Elderly men and woman in rehab facilities who have had stokes or TBI have to relearn how to hold a pencil or a crayon, completing a picture they have colored gives them a real sense of accomplishment which improves self esteem and then opens the door to other types of art.
    Coloring is restful and reduces anxiety.
    It’s just another avenue to help patients begin to love art again

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      HI Hilary:

      Thanks so much for taking the time to read and comment. I love your example about the elderly and stroke victims and your therapeutic use of coloring pages, I feel like it’s such a clear example of how this structured activity is beneficial, and I’m so glad folks have that information here.

      The first section of my post outlines some of the same points about how a structured activity like coloring pages can be a containing and mindful activity. My purpose is to validate folks’ use and enjoyment of coloring books, while also holding out the benefits of taking expressive art further for those who wish to (and are capable of) doing so.

      Cheers,

      Amy

      Reply
      • Masha

        Comment to Amy
        I love your blog and I have found so much inspiration and ideas from your posts! I have been inspired to start a journal, something I have been putting off for a while and it’s all thanks to you!
        I was disappointed to miss the art journaling webinar, I couldn’t access it as I am not subscribed to Facebook.
        But I love your posts and that is the first place I go to when I take the opportunity for a few minutes of self care. I love the new look on your site.
        Keep up the great work.

        Reply
        • Amy Johnson Maricle

          HI Masha:

          WOW – you are so amazing. I’m so psyched for you starting the art journal. 🙂 No need to miss the webinar, it’s right here: The Art Journaling Basics Webinar

          Be sure to get on the mailing list to get that dose of creativity right in your mailbox if you haven’t already. Sounds like you are taking full advantage of everything! What kind of journal did you buy?

          Cheers,

          Amy

          Reply
    • Masha

      Comment to Hilary,
      Thanks for your addition to the discussion. I was particularly interested in your comments as I am starting an internship with a group of stroke victims this July and I’d love to hear more about this community, or be directed to any helpful resources.
      I can be reached at mashatlc@yahoo.com

      Reply
  6. Margaret

    Hi Amy,
    This is an absolutely great idea of such a therapeutic and artistic book. !

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      HI Margaret:

      Welcome to Mindful Art Studio! I’m so pleased that you enjoyed the post and the idea for the journal. I’d love to hear how it goes if you try something similar. Have you used cloth or sewing on paper before? I’m always interested in others’ insights too.

      Cheers,

      Amy

      Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      HI Lanie:

      Thanks so much for taking the time to read and comment! You are very kind with your compliments as well. Folks should definitely check out your post. I’ve found myself feeling tossed and turned a bit with this discussion as I hear what folks have to say on both sides. What about you? and I’d love to see a part two!

      Cheers,

      Amy

      Reply
  7. Wendy

    I have suggested coloring books (in particular mandala coloring books) to patients, but I have never used them in art therapy sessions. I have found that for myself when I am most stressed, sometimes it can be calming to do something productive that requires very little thinking or interpretation. Also something repetitive can be soothing, so often I prefer to go for knitting or crochet, but if I want a quick relaxation that’s easy and kinda mindless, coloring is alright. Also, I have a collection of adult coloring books, because some of them make me laugh. The Gangster Rap Coloring Book, for example, is not something I color in or would share with anyone, but it makes me happy to know it exists in my collection. I also like the adult books that have creative prompts like the Anti-Journal, because there are communities of people forming who do them and post on social media. It’s cool to form connections with people following the same prompt and see how each interprets it.

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      HI Wendy!

      As an art therapist, you do such a great job of outlining a continuum of art projects – for soothing (due to repetitiveness and not having to think) and for more creativity- like the Anti-Journal. I loved too how you gave examples of when and why you value each for yourself and your clients.

      Creatively Yours,
      Amy

      Reply
  8. Dorlee

    Hi Amy,

    I loved how you both embraced adult coloring books as one avenue of engaging in art/mindful activity as well as encouraged the perspective of seeing it as a stepping stone to further artistic exploration and experimentation.

    It was truly an illustration of mindful acceptance and compassion… we need to start with people where they are… and recognize their strengths. It is a strength to reach out and look for healthy self-soothing activities (and what is calming for one person may not work for another).

    Best,
    Dorlee

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      Hi Dorlee:

      It is always so lovely to have your voice here in this community. First of all, you so beautifully sum up what I wanted to say in longer form. Thank you for that. Secondly, you also make the point more eloquently, and I love that you highlighted the role of mindful acceptance and looking for ways to meet everyone’s needs.

      Thank you,

      Amy

      Reply
  9. Jenn

    I just wanted to say that as a non-artist, I find coloring books very calming and focusing. Seeing an empty page creates in me a great deal of anxiety at times, so having a place to start feels much safer. I disagree with Lisa Mitchell that coloring books are as empty as watching television. When I’m coloring, I’m deciding how colors will look together, taking a risk in putting my decision on paper, and reflecting on how I feel about what I’m doing and what I’ve done. When I’m coloring something familiar, like flowers and leaves, there’s also an element of remembering the past time I saw a plant like that. For me, it brings up a lot of childhood memories. Like another commenter mentioned, I’ve had clients color mandalas before (they were given the option of drawing or creating one, but none chose that option) and it did help the clients relieve stress and focus their attention.

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      HI Jenn:

      Welcome to Mindful Art Studio. Thank you so much for adding to the discussion about why you find coloring books to be a good creative stress buster. It’s been a very interesting for me hearing from both sides, both here on the blog, and on professional boards on LinkedIn, and I appreciate having you add to that.

      Cheers!

      Amy

      Reply
  10. Annabelle

    I must confess that I haven’t read all the comments, but it looks like there is a rich and fascinating conversation going on here.

    I am a creative and body-centered therapist and board certified dance/movement therapist. I happen to love adult coloring books and encourage many of my clients to use them for mindful focus, for grounding and centering using a concrete tool, for anxiety reduction.

    Many clients find them very helpful not only for these reasons, but also as a bite sized way to begin to reconnect with art and with play and with expression. This is a big step for many. And it’s doable, when another more involved process might be just plain too much.

    I think coloring books or pages are a tool not a process. Like most anything else – Facebook, forks and knives, a computer, a garden hose — they can be used in so many many ways that range from very helpful to not.

    How and why are we using them? Does it feel creative, additive, useful? If not, then there might be more questions to ask.

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      HI Annabelle:

      Welcome to Mindful Art Studio! I so enjoyed reading your thoughtful comment, and even more so enjoyed hopping over to your beautiful site: http://movement-matters.com. It makes me wish we worked closer by so that we could collaborate. I love using movement in my work and it seems like you are coming from a very rich place in yours.

      In regards to the coloring books, I agree that they can be a way to help folks who have not been in touch with art since they were very young to begin again. I appreciate you highlighting this. I also like your thoughtful questions about why and how we are using any given tool, and taking the opportunity to examine whether or not its serving a purpose for us that really helps us flourish.

      I look forward to hearing you again and again in this community, Annabelle. Thank you again so much for stopping by.

      Creatively Yours,

      Amy

      Reply
  11. Sparks

    I have to laugh at people who are so anti-coloring. It’s a harmless hobby for literally millions of people world-wide, and often replaces far more negative activities. Some of those I’ve heard people cite are the ones you listed above, as well as (night) snacking, online shopping, and for many, panic attacks, anxiety and even bouts of depression. It gives you something pleasant and uncomplicated to focus on for a bit. What many bloviators fail to recognize is that millions of people have been quietly coloring their whole adult lives. I used to love coloring the huge Doodle Art posters in the late 70’s and early 80’s. It was a relaxing and constructive thing to do when I got home from work at 3:15 in the morning. I love color, I love playing with color. There is only so much makeup and nail polish one woman can own before even she (I), say enough! The spouse is not into the idea of painting the inside of the house once a year, so I have to channel that love of color somewhere. The explosion of the availability of ‘coloring books’ with adult themes and varying amounts of complexity has been an absolute joy. The amount I’m saving on reading material far exceeds what I’ve spent on coloring supplies (and I still had a large box of pencils, markers and oil paints tucked away). I still read far more than the average person, but I’m not gulping books down at the rate of 1-2 a day, which was very expensive. I’ve also cut my time on social media by 60-70%, and that was most definitely not a loss. I hope eventually, some colorists will come forward and make their art public. Yes, if you had seen the complexity and beauty of what so many are creating with colored/watercolor pencils and line drawing from other artists, you would definitely call it art. For those perhaps less talented, but are able to cope with negative things in their lives with coloring rather than pills, I say more power to them. To those that rant that coloring books are stupid, useless, and maybe even harmful I say, Chill dude. Get a coloring book and some crayons. You’ll feel so much better.

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      HI Sparks:

      Thank you so much for sharing your perspective on the helpfulness of coloring books. I’m so happy that you find enjoyment and fun in them. I have always been an advocate for people doing what works for them. I’m simply offering an invitation for those who might wish, things a step further artistically. If it’s not for you, then color on!

      Cheers,

      Amy

      Reply
  12. Tammy

    Ok, so maybe coloring books can’t be considered “art therapy” in the truest sense. However, I believe they have value and usefulness for many adults, no matter the age. I was never creative as a child or a teen. I had no artistic side. Sure, I tried art classes all through junior high and high school, and worked hard at them, but was an utter failure. It’s just not my talent to draw or create. I can needlepoint and crochet, but that is about as “crafty” and “artistic” as I get. Oh yeah, I generally follow a pattern or layout of some type. I just don’t think that way, nor do I have a the talent to be creative. I’m just a linear thinker, I suppose, I’m not good with making a design, drawing, or anything like that. I’m quiet, an introvert, and avid reader (often reading a book every day or two).
    I am a registered nurse, and I worked until health problems (both those that began at birth or in childhood, as well as those that developed later) made it impossible for me to even just walk the halls. Those health problems also made it difficult for me to use my counseling degree, or to continue as I would wish with my disability law practice. I have lupus, chronic pain, as well as other issues. Because it was/is impossible to do much, I would read, watch tv, crochet and needlepoint on “good” days, and surf the net.
    A few months ago, my mother read an article on how coloring could possibly help with depression and pain, and encouraged me to buy a coloring book (whether grown up or not). I did so, just an easy one from the local store, brought it home, and was hooked. It does, for me at least, allow me to push away/ “forget” the pain, anxiety, depression, and feelings of frustration at not being able to do much. Depending on the day, I might not color at all, or I might spend 2 or more hours planning a design and/or coloring. Whereas I used to surf the net, looking at videos, shopping, and feeling as though I was just wasting time, I now use the net to look for coloring ideas: planning palates, looking for colors that go well together, different techniques, etc. When I finish a picture now, I feel a sense of achievement, knowing that even though someone else drew the picture, that I planned the color palate, perhaps used a new technique, and completed a picture.
    I also had noticed how some older people I know, some with dementia, some not, seem to enjoy coloring a picture as well, and have expressed the same sentiment. Those with dementia who could not focus and were fidgety can/will focus their whole attention on a drawing, whether they stay in the lines or not. Some have expressed that when they color, they feel a level of control often denied to the elderly (in a nursing center or hospital, they really do lose control of the decisions they used to make; such as when/what to eat, where/when they can go places, and so on), THEY are making the decisions for themselves.
    I didn’t intend this to be a rant, though it may sound so. (And, truly, I’ve never written a reply to an article like this.) I understand that your intention was to suggest people that they be more “creative”. However, it angers me that people want to imply-or say right out-that coloring isn’t “creative”. You talk about how YOUR types of art and creativity are “winding, unplanned, and healing”. So, because others are not, perhaps CAN’T, be (due to health issue and other things) creative in the way you are, you imply that they are somehow less than you. You say things like this, but you most likely never think of the fact that many might read this, and then think they are perhaps not as good of a person in some way because they haven’t what you consider the right creativity. I stumbled upon your ‘article’ while searching for new coloring techniques, and others may, as well. One CAN, and often does, put a lot of creativity and expression into a coloring page, even though a general outline may be given., though that isn’t your opinion. You completely contradict yourself: you “cringe” at paint nite images, yet you encourage participation; you’d never buy your little darlings coloring books, but tell others they should buy one. After all, what’s the harm? Oh yes, some “art” snob might see them ‘playing’ with crayons and look down upon them because it obviously shows that they can’t think for themselves or have an ounce of self expression in their make up. Perhaps, as you say, you intended to validate use and enjoyment of coloring books, but you clearly don’t. Your so called article is simply a thinly veiled attempt at telling those who use and enjoy coloring books that they aren’t creative, they aren’t as ‘good’ as you, because you are more creative. You should perhaps think about your statement that “the gift is focusing on the good”. That doesn’t mean you need to be snarky about others who may not be endowed with your expectation of creativity.

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      HI Tammy:

      Thank you so much for your thought provoking comment. I’m not sure if you had a chance to read through some of the previous comments and my replies, but I really learned a lot about folks’ experience with coloring books through the responses to this post. MANY folks have shared similar stories to you, and I appreciate you teaching me about their usefulness. I sincerely apologize that my comments read as veiled ways of implying that you are not as creative or good somehow. I too have always enjoyed cross-stitch, crochet, and many other crafts. I applaud your knowing what works for you and standing up for it, and I’m so grateful that you’ve found something that helps you deal with the pain.

      All the Best to You,
      Amy

      Reply
  13. Sylvia

    I have only recently begun coloring. I quickly discovered that while I color, I am engaged in intercession; it just flowed out naturally. A person comes to mind and I begin to intercede for that person. I can be very creative as I learn to blend colors, learn how to choose the best colored pencils for my purpose, and so forth. So pre-drawn pages are working very well for me at this time. I simply have too many other things going in my life to even want to draw my own designs or do other artsy things besides my coloring, crocheting and embroidery. Maybe someday…..:)

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      Hi Sylvia:

      I love hearing about how calming coloring is for you. I felt calmer just reading! Thank you for sharing your insights! If in the future you ever decide you’d like to work on some of your own designs, I have a DIY Adult Coloring Book. I give you some starting ideas. It’s basically giving the structure for doodling, akin to Zentangle. You may decide you always enjoy the coloring part strictly, and that’s fine too. I would imagine that your embroidery could get influenced by the coloring too? In any case, I’m so glad you’ve found these outlets.
      Cheers,
      Amy

      Reply
      • Sylvia

        Thank you for your sweet words. I did download your coloring book and printed it. I have a number of mandalas printed. Sometimes I get frustrated with my color choices/patterns, but I watched a video and got some tips. Blending colors was totally new to me. I think the key to all of these art forms is to do what one enjoys and finds most meaningful, so that it is relaxing and that it does not become ‘one more thing’ on a to-do list. And for me, the ambience of my environment as I color makes a huge impact on the benefit. I like to have soft music, pleasant lighting and a lit candle or diffuser to perfume the air; thus, many of my senses are incorporated into the experience, which condition me to really get into the process each time I approach my “art center”. Blessings, Sylvia.

        Reply
        • Amy Johnson Maricle

          Sylvia – Thank YOU for sharing so much of your wonderful process! I would say too, another thing you might try for color combinations is not not think at all – simply look at your colors and take the first one to catch you attention, each time. You might try one mandala this way and see what happens, if you wish.

          Cheers,
          Amy

          Reply
  14. Lauren

    I disagree that ‘not a lot of thought’ is needed when using colouring in books: the pages are empty of colour, choosing a medium through which to complete it, choosing the colour, neither of these are arbitrary decisions. While I don’t necessarily think they’re anything much beyond a pleasant and enjoyable pasttime (I think there’s a bit of an exaggeration around their benefits in terms of ‘therapy’, significant positive impacts on mental health for example, for me at least) I’ve found it massively rewarding to start this hobby! It’s just so lovely to get back from work, unplug from technology and do something that doesn’t require electricity. I don’t get much from colouring in for colouring in’s sake, it has to be a book I find beautiful, but when I do find a book I love, it brings me so much joy to sit and colour while listening to music or watching TV.

    Johanna Basford’s books are by far my favourite, Secret Garden and Enchanted Forest especially. The drawings are so beautiful and intricate, I get pleasure simply from leafing through the pages and looking at the gorgeous art she’s created, before I even think about adding to it myself. I’m not one for buying tens or hundreds of books for the sake of it and only have five books total (three of Basford’s books and the two Millie Marottas, which are equally as beautiful but only slightly less appealing to me as I love the treasure hunt aspect of Basford’s books) but it’s been great to regress to being a kid and loving stationery, choosing felt tips and pencils, I have a little colouring basket with books and pencils in and it’s the first thing I reach for most nights although I’ve only been doing it for six months.

    There is much joy to be had in a mindless pasttime for the pure sake of enjoyment: I read, play piano, watch TV, see friends, but there’s something about colouring I love because it’s so private and personal, no pressure to be artistic or creative and create something out of nothing… it’s like being creative within parameters and I think that’s made millions of people feel really safe in expressing themselves when a blank page would have been way too intimidating.

    Reply
    • Amy Johnson Maricle

      Hi Lauren: Thank you so much for taking the time to read and comment and give your beautiful explanation about what you find so relaxing and fun about adult coloring books. I agree that it’s a way to be “creative within parameters” that has brought many more people to pick up colors and creative materials. Thank you so much for your insights.

      Cheers,
      Amy

      Reply

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